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Bird Identification Contest!

 This Red-Bellied Woodpecker came to our feeders today.  We’ve seen this type of bird other years but this was the first time this winter that he’s made an appearance and it was pretty exciting.  
This is the Tufted Titmouse.  He is here often with all of his buddies.  A very pretty bird but common at our feeder so we don’t get as excited when he visits us.  ๐Ÿ™‚
 I must sound like an old lady but I absolutely LOVE sitting at my dining table every morning and watching the birds each day.  I get my coffee and my computer for writing and I make sure I can see right out of the window.  How lucky am I that I can intertwine my personal life and my work in this way?  
I recently put out new feed including meal worms (I know, yuck but a good source of protein for many of the birds during the cold months) and suet and now we are getting a variety of different birds which is really fun.
This is the female Downy Woodpecker.  They are common year-round in Connecticut.  The male looks the same but has a red spot on the back of his head and that is how I can tell the difference.  This is another common woodpecker that we have seen in years past but haven’t yet this winter until we put out the suet.  This bird looks identical to the Hairy Woodpecker but it is much smaller (about 6″).
Of course, we always love seeing the cardinals.  I see the males more frequently than the females so I love it when she comes for a visit.  I wonder if the males are the ones who tend to bring the food back to the nest more and that is why I see them more often?  I know their call now by heart and can hear when they are on the back deck before I even see them.  There is something about the coloring of the female cardinal that I find so subtly beautiful.

 I also see a ton of Blue Jays but they are very bossy and take over the feeders when they come around.  They are very pretty but I just don’t like their attitude much ๐Ÿ˜‰ 
Here we have the male Dark-Eyed Junco.  Another very common bird at my feeders.  They migrate from Canada to Connecticut so we see them more in the winter time.  I’m not sure why they bother anymore as Connecticut has been just as cold as up north the last few winters.  I actually wonder if the migrating of birds will change after seeing our climate shift so much recently.  At one point, I had a dream of buying a winter cabin in Vermont to enjoy the snow and quad riding but it seems Connecticut is the new Vermont these days and we won’t really have to budge.
I’m pretty sure this bird is a Song Sparrow.  I know it is a sparrow but can’t seem to find a good picture match in my field guides and the Song Sparrow was as close as I could find.  

Here is another new bird and this one I have never seen at our feeders before.  It is the White-Throated Sparrow.  There are two variations of this type of sparrow and the one we have is the white-striped kind (not the tan-striped one).  Really beautiful and it was fun trying to discover what type of bird it was.
 Another frequent visitor is this guy, the Black-Capped Chickadee.  We see them ALL the time so again, while very pretty, the excitement gets lost after awhile. 

Years ago, we created this wonderful Bird Chart for our home.  We drew pictures of the most common birds that come to our feeder and put tally marks next to them whenever we see them.  I’m considering making a new chart soon as we’ve used this one QUITE a bit… but it is a fun activity and something you should try at home if you have the time.
 NOW I want to challenge you!  There are two more *brand new birds* that I saw at my feeder today that I’ve never seen before.  I’ve figured out what type of birds they are after doing some research but can you and your children?  
Take your time to look at both photos and either research in the library or online with your children to discover what type of birds they are.  Remember, we live in Connecticut.  
Parents – do your best to let the children do most of the research with your help and use this as a nature enrichment activity if possible…
Bird #1  
Bird #2
Once you think you know what type of birds they are, post in the comments section of this post with your guesses and your name.  On February 19th (one week from today), we will randomly choose a winner from the comments section and announce it on our blog.  It will not matter if you get the names right or not, we just want you to give it a good try so let the children decide what they think the right answers are.  
The winner will receive a FREE E-Book of their choice from Little Acorn Learning filled with even more wonderful activities to do with your children! 
Good luck and I hope you enjoy this project as a fun nature lesson to share with your class or family. 
xoxo

28 thoughts on “Bird Identification Contest!”

  1. Number 1 is:

    Eastern Towhee A.K.A Rufous-sided Towhee.

    Number 2 is:

    it is NOT winter wren,
    NOT house wren,

    So it must be a Carolina wren.

  2. Number 1 is:

    Eastern Towhee A.K.A Rufous-sided Towhee.

    Number 2 is:

    it is NOT winter wren,
    NOT house wren,

    So it must be a Carolina wren.

  3. Number 1 is:

    Eastern Towhee A.K.A Rufous-sided Towhee.

    Number 2 is:

    it is NOT winter wren,
    NOT house wren,

    So it must be a Carolina wren.

  4. Hello. My daughter, Isabelle (9) thinks they are:

    1. Rufous-sided Towhee (one of her mommy's favorite birds)
    2. Carolina Wren (we live in South Carolina) She knew it immediately. We have one that makes a nest every year on our back porch.

    Thank you

    Laura R

  5. Hello. My daughter, Isabelle (9) thinks they are:

    1. Rufous-sided Towhee (one of her mommy's favorite birds)
    2. Carolina Wren (we live in South Carolina) She knew it immediately. We have one that makes a nest every year on our back porch.

    Thank you

    Laura R

  6. Hello. My daughter, Isabelle (9) thinks they are:

    1. Rufous-sided Towhee (one of her mommy's favorite birds)
    2. Carolina Wren (we live in South Carolina) She knew it immediately. We have one that makes a nest every year on our back porch.

    Thank you

    Laura R

  7. I realized I came up as anonymous instead of Milo.

    #1 Eastern toehee
    #2 Carolina wren

    Identified by 5-year-old Milo.

    We also have feeders set up that we watch all the time. The kids use a pocket guide to birds that we keep on the table. When in doubt we use the iBird app which is excellent.

  8. I realized I came up as anonymous instead of Milo.

    #1 Eastern toehee
    #2 Carolina wren

    Identified by 5-year-old Milo.

    We also have feeders set up that we watch all the time. The kids use a pocket guide to birds that we keep on the table. When in doubt we use the iBird app which is excellent.

  9. I realized I came up as anonymous instead of Milo.

    #1 Eastern toehee
    #2 Carolina wren

    Identified by 5-year-old Milo.

    We also have feeders set up that we watch all the time. The kids use a pocket guide to birds that we keep on the table. When in doubt we use the iBird app which is excellent.

  10. Egan and Ollie (ages 8 and 6) Think that:
    Bird #1 is a Rufous-Sided Towhee
    Bird #2 is a Carolina Wren (even though it is rare in CT)

    They love bird watching and used what they already knew and then checked their bird books.

  11. Egan and Ollie (ages 8 and 6) Think that:
    Bird #1 is a Rufous-Sided Towhee
    Bird #2 is a Carolina Wren (even though it is rare in CT)

    They love bird watching and used what they already knew and then checked their bird books.

  12. Egan and Ollie (ages 8 and 6) Think that:
    Bird #1 is a Rufous-Sided Towhee
    Bird #2 is a Carolina Wren (even though it is rare in CT)

    They love bird watching and used what they already knew and then checked their bird books.

  13. #1 Eastern toehee
    #2 Carolina wren

    Identified by 5-year-old Milo.

    We also have feeders set up that we watch all the time. The kids use a pocket guide to birds that we keep on the table. When in doubt we use the iBird app which is excellent.

  14. #1 Eastern toehee
    #2 Carolina wren

    Identified by 5-year-old Milo.

    We also have feeders set up that we watch all the time. The kids use a pocket guide to birds that we keep on the table. When in doubt we use the iBird app which is excellent.

  15. Hi my name is Addison. I am 6 years old. I used "what bird" to identify these birds. I think #1 is an Eastern Towhee and #2 is a Winter Wren. Thank you for this post; we had fun looking up the bird images with my baby sisters. ๐Ÿ™‚ I hope we win because I really want a new E-Book for our homeschool library!

  16. Hi my name is Addison. I am 6 years old. I used "what bird" to identify these birds. I think #1 is an Eastern Towhee and #2 is a Winter Wren. Thank you for this post; we had fun looking up the bird images with my baby sisters. ๐Ÿ™‚ I hope we win because I really want a new E-Book for our homeschool library!

  17. Hi my name is Addison. I am 6 years old. I used "what bird" to identify these birds. I think #1 is an Eastern Towhee and #2 is a Winter Wren. Thank you for this post; we had fun looking up the bird images with my baby sisters. ๐Ÿ™‚ I hope we win because I really want a new E-Book for our homeschool library!

  18. Hi, our names are Noah and Lauren. We love birds as well! We think that bird #1 is an Eastern Towhee and that bird #2 is a Carolina Wren.
    Thank you Little Acorn Learning!

  19. Hi, our names are Noah and Lauren. We love birds as well! We think that bird #1 is an Eastern Towhee and that bird #2 is a Carolina Wren.
    Thank you Little Acorn Learning!

  20. Hi, our names are Noah and Lauren. We love birds as well! We think that bird #1 is an Eastern Towhee and that bird #2 is a Carolina Wren.
    Thank you Little Acorn Learning!

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